How to Use Nutrition to Reduce the risk of Heart Attacks

Of the various known heart failures, coronary heart disease (CHD)—more commonly known as a heart attack—is the most common in industrialised countries, including Singapore.

According to the Ministry of Health, CHD (also known as Ischemic Heart Disease) is the third principal cause of death in Singapore for the years 2015-2017 [source: https://www.moh.gov.sg/resources-statistics/singapore-health-facts/principal-causes-of-death], while the Institute of Health Metrics & Evaluation (IHME) lists it as the top cause of death and premature death in Singapore for 2017 [source: http://www.healthdata.org/singapore].

Although CHD is a life threatening condition, it can be prevented and managed by understanding the symptoms and causes of a heart attack, and taking steps to prevent its development.

 

What is Coronary Heart Disease

CHD occurs when the arteries supplying blood to the heart become narrow or blocked. This reduces the amount of oxygen supplied to the heart muscle, and it subsequently suffers damage. If the damage severely affects the heart’s ability to pump blood, a ‘heart attack’ or heart failure occurs.

The narrowing or blockage of coronary arteries is typically caused by atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of fatty lipids or low density lipoproteins (LDL) in the coronary arteries.

Other factors that contribute to atherosclerosis include:

  • High blood cholesterol levels
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Heavy smoking
  • Obesity
  • Unhealthy diet
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Excessive mental stress
  • Sleep apnea
  • Family history
  • Old age: males over the age of 45, females over the age of 55 are at higher risk

 

Symptoms of a Heart Attack

Most people fail to recognise a heart attack as the symptoms are varied.

The main symptom of CHD is an angina, which is a squeezing tightness in the chest, signalling that the heart is not receiving sufficient blood and oxygen. Sometimes there may be pain, which may spread to the abdomen, the upper left part of the body, neck, and jaw instead of being concentrated in the chest.

However, there are incidences when an angina is “silent”, where there is no physical discomfort or pain felt by the person. It is in such cases where a heart attack gets its name as “the silent killer”. An angina can also be stable or unstable.

A stable angina presents itself as a regular or predictable pattern, such as pain or discomfort when walking up a flight of stairs or during activities that increase the heart rate.

An unstable angina occurs without warning. It presents itself as a sudden sharp pain without any prior symptoms or CHD, and can occur even with no physical exertion. Thus, the unstable angina is a more serious condition than the stable angina.

Although the risk factors for CHD are many, they can be managed with lifestyle choices that include sensible nutrition and regular exercise.

 

Nutrition for Heart Health

IHME states that the top contributing risk factor driving death and disability combined, including CHD, is dietary risks. What we eat—and don’t eat—greatly affects our health and mortality.

Saturated fats and trans fats are the biggest contributing factor to blood cholesterol levels—high LDL levels in the blood and trans fat have both been linked to increased heart disease. It is recommended to lower the intake of saturated fat as well as avoid trans fat to lower the risk of CHD. This can be achieved by switching to foods with mono and polyunsaturated fats, which has generally been shown to lower LDL levels in the blood. Simple changes such as opting for vegetable oils, as well as reducing the consumption of high-fat meat products, cheeses, whole-milk products, and processed and/or packaged foods.

Some people believe that overconsumption of sodium may increase blood pressure, and in turn increase the risk of heart disease. Many packaged foods contain high levels of sodium, so be sure to check food labels. Aim to consume no more than 1,500mg of sodium per day by opting reducing packaged foods, choosing low-sodium alternatives, or replacing sodium with herb spice blends.

Potassium can be useful in counterbalancing the effects of sodium—it helps lower blood pressure, which is healthy for the heart. It is naturally abundant in vegetables and fruit, including bananas, avocadoes, and kiwis. Blend them into a breakfast smoothie bowl or smoothie drink, together with Nuzest Clean Lean Protein or Just Fruit & Veg for an added boost.

Soluble fibre helps inhibit cholesterol absorption in the small intestine, thus reducing LDL blood cholesterol levels. Oats, barley, legumes and fruit are rich in soluble fibres. A good source of soluble fibre is psyllium husk, which is good dietary supplement for those who are unable to get sufficient fibre from their daily meals.

Plant sterols have also been shown to lower LDL blood cholesterol levels by inhibiting cholesterol absorption. They can be obtained in plant based dietary supplements, including Nuzest’s Good Green Stuff powder and bar and Clean Lean Protein bar.

Omega-3 fatty acids, also known as EPA and DNA, are healthy fats that lower blood triglyceride levels. They may be beneficial for those with CHD.

Moderate alcohol intake and avoid binge drinking, as alcohol can raise blood pressure and contribute to empty calories, which may lead to weight gain. Males are advised to consume less than seven drinks a week, and females no more than four drinks a week

 

Exercising for Heart Health

Give your heart a lift, literally, with exercises. Movement increases the amount of oxygen supplied to the blood, which reduces the workload on your heart muscle. Exercise also lowers blood triglycerides as your body needs to convert fat into energy. This helps with weight loss, improves insulin sensitivity, and lowers blood pressure.

It is recommended to engage in at least 30-minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most days of the week. Begin with a brisk stroll, gentle yoga, or simply taking the staircase instead of the lift up to your apartment.


Make Heart Healthy Choices

Although CHD is life threatening and develops due to various genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors, it can be managed effectively with consistent physical activity and nutritious eating habits.

Begin by including more fresh, whole, and plant-based foods in your daily meals, gradually reducing the amount of processed and packaged foods. Including plant based supplements, such as Nuzest products, can provide an added boost for your heart health.

HOW A HEALTHY DIET CAN HELP YOU AVOID TYPE 2 DIABETES

According to SingHealth, diabetes affects 9% of the population in Singapore, with Type 2 diabetes more common amongst Singaporeans. While full remission of Type 2 diabetes may not be achieved, it is possible to reverse it with nutrition.

What is Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes usually presents itself in one of two ways:

  • the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin for the cells of the body to metabolise sugar; or
  • the body has become resistant to insulin, and thus is not absorbing enough insulin to metabolise sugar.

In either scenario, there is insufficient insulin for the body to keep blood glucose levels normal. Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age. So it can affect anyone, ranging from children to senior adults.

Some common risk factors of diabetes include:

  • Higher than normal blood glucose levels, which is a condition known as prediabetes;
  • High blood pressure and cholesterol;
  • Excess weight, especially around the abdomen, since fatty tissues increase the body’s resistance to insulin;
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Increased age.

Diabetes symptoms include:

  • Excessive thirst and frequent urination
  • Increased hunger
  • Blurred vision
  • Frequent skin infections and/or wounds that take a long time to heal
  • A feeling of tiredness over prolonged periods of time

However, as Type 2 Diabetes develops slowly, and with some people displaying none of the known diabetes symptoms, many people may be unaware that they have the condition until their health is seriously affected.

One of these conditions is known as hyperglycemia, where the blood sugar levels are higher than normal. If left unmanaged, hyperglycemia can cause to complications that affect the kidney, eyes, nerves, and heart.

Can I Stop the Progress of Type 2 Diabetes?

While it is not easy, many people have been able to slow down the progress of diabetes, and even reverse it. It involves intensive lifestyle management that often involves weight loss and improved nutrition.

A 2014 study into the frequency of remission of Type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention compared to diabetes support and education alone concluded that, in overweight adults, intensive interventions with weight loss were more likely to result in partial or complete remission.

A 2016 study examining the effects of a very low-calorie diet on patients with Type 2 diabetes found that a sustainable weight loss program was effective in lowering fasting plasma glucose, and potentially reversing Type 2 diabetes.

Lastly, a 2014 study by the Second University of Naples showed a low-carb Mediterranean-style diet helped 15% of participants achieve remission within one year. Other diets, including low-fat diets were also tested, but with less robust results.

It seems that carbohydrate and caloric intake is most associated with reversing diabetes.

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes with Nutrition

Insulin injections and other medication are commonly used to manage Type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. However, a more sustainable and lasting approach would be using nutrition—together with physical activity—to reverse the condition, especially for those who wish to wean off their dependence on diabetes or hyperglycemia medication.

The way to do so is to break the cycle of strain on the cells that produce insulin, which can be assisted through a healthful diet and physical activity. Start with eating a varied diet consisting of fruit, vegetables, whole grain products, and lean protein, and reduce the consumption of processed food.

Plant Protein vs Animal derived protein – Going head to head

Plant based protein is the biggest story in today’s protein market. By incorporating plant-based proteins into diets it is possible to decrease or fully eliminate meat consumption. Due to this more and more are adopting vegetarian and vegan lifestyles. However, many people are still focused on consuming “high quality” meat products either for taste preferences, or because they believe meat is nutritionally superior. We want to set out the challenge of answering the underlying question “what is the difference between plant protein versus animal protein?”

Amino Acids in Plant Protein and Animal Protein

Protein is made up of amino acids. A total of 20 amino acids are needed by the human body. Of the required 20 amino acids, 9 are considered “essential,” meaning they must be obtained through the diet. The other 11 amino acids can be synthesized in the body.

Animal proteins tend to deliver all of the amino acids you need in one food. But what is not commonly known is that you don’t have to get all amino acids in one meal to experience the benefits. For years, it was believed that plant proteins were somehow inferior to animal protein. The premise was; plant proteins could only be “incomplete” proteins – meaning they lacked one or several of the the essential amino acids. In order to be “complete,” one would have to diligently plan meals to get a full range of amino acids. This is where the whole “you need to eat rice and beans together for complete protein” idea comes from.  Since this time, science has entirely debunked the myth that you need to consume all amino acids simultaneously to reap the protein rewards. We now know that you can consume various forms of plant foods with different amino acid profiles separately (spaced out throughout the day, across a few days, etc.) and still get adequate use of dietary protein.  Eating a robust, varied diet complete with various plant-proteins, you can get a full range of the amino acids that your body needs, even as a vegan. The Nuzest Clean Lean Protein has a complete panel of amino acids.

Animal Protein, Plant-Protein, and Chronic Disease

The World Health Organization (WHO) currently classifies red meat as a Group 2A carcinogen, meaning that it is probably carcinogenic to humans (meaning they believe red meat might cause cancer) Processed meat is classified as a Group 1 carcinogen, meaning, it is cancer-causing to humans based on sufficient human data. Limiting intake of red and processed meat could be beneficial in lowering cancer risks.

Furthermore, epidemiological studies of various dietary habits have shown that vegetarian and vegan diets are usually protective in terms of cancer risk and that fruit and vegetable consumption is linked with lower risk of cancer. Additionally, plant foods usually are full of free-radical quenching antioxidants, which can help protect your body from harmful oxidative reactions and are often rich in fiber. Other large observational studies have connected red meat consumption with cardiovascular disease and processed meat with increased risk of cardiovascular-related deaths, as well as increased risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

The amount of red and processed meat you consume makes a difference!

You don’t have to go fully vegan in order to benefit from the wide ranging benefits of plant-based foods. Even if you love meat, cutting back on animal proteins from processed and red meat sources may be beneficial against these diseases, especially if you replace meat with nutrient-rich plant foods such as legumes, nuts, beans, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables.

Protein and The Environment: Is Meat Sustainable?

It is accepted that meat is simply less environmentally friendly. Producing just one kilogram of beef (or 2.2 pounds) emits a hefty 26 kilograms of carbon dioxide. Lamb emits even more carbon dioxide: roughly 39 kilograms of CO2 per kilogram of meat. Livestock also emits methane (another greenhouse gas) from burps, farts, and poop.

To complicate things further, even ‘healthier alternatives’ such as grass fed livestock tend to emit even more greenhouse gases compared to factory-farmed livestock due to efficiency in terms of land-use and resources.

Plant proteins typically produce far fewer carbon emissions. For example, a kilogram of lentils emits 0.7. kilograms of carbon dioxide (CO2), a strikingly lesser amount than livestock production. Furthermore, they tend to have a much smaller water footprint, making them an overall more sustainable food choice.

Even if you’re a fan of meat, swapping some animal protein for plant-based protein will not only be beneficial for your health, but it will also help shrink the overall carbon footprint you produce. To add more plant-based protein to your diet, check out Nuzest Clean Lean Protein or other products in the Nuzest lineup.

We have a range of amazing Clean Lean Protein Smoothies, Smoothie Bowls and other recipes for you to follow!  Check these out here.

* Original article posted by Nuzest USA https://www.nuzest-usa.com/need-know-plant-protein-vs-animal-protein

Turmeric for post-workout recovery

We’ve all felt it – that pain and stiffness that occurs several hours (and even days!) after unaccustomed exercise or overworking a particular muscle group. Known as ‘delayed onset muscle soreness’ (DOMS), we typically experience these pains when eccentric muscle activity is involved and the contracting muscles are forcibly lengthened.1 This mechanical stress triggers an inflammatory response and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in sustained inflammation and oxidative stress which can eventually lead to muscle injury and the dreaded DOMS.2

The medicinal benefits of regular turmeric consumption have been well documented; from improving brain function to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease, preventing and treating Alzheimer’s Disease and even fighting certain types of cancer. What is less commonly known is that Curcumin (the active constituent of Turmeric that gives it its distinctive yellow colour) has also proven to be beneficial in recovery from exercise due to its powerful antioxidant and inflammatory effects.

To test the theory, a trial was carried out to measure the effects of oral curcumin versus placebo on DOMS following unaccustomed heavy eccentric exercise. The study was a double-blind, randomised-controlled crossover trial in which the Curcumin or placebo were taken two days before to three days after eccentric exercise and the results found that only the Curcumin had beneficial effects. These included:

  • moderate to large reductions in single-leg squat and gluteal stretch pain at 24 and 48 hours post exercise,
  • reduced pain on walking down stairs, and
  • improved muscle performance.3

Another recent randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind trial comparing Curcumin with placebo was designed to assess the muscle damage of healthy male volunteers after performing a 45 minute downhill running race. Results found that 1g of turmeric given twice daily resulted in:

  • reduced MRI evidence of muscle injury in the posterior and medial compartment of both thighs,
  • less pain in the lower legs, and
  • reduced systemic inflammatory response in comparison to placebo.2

The results from these studies suggest that turmeric has the potential to be very beneficial in reducing post-exercise soreness after high intensity training.

Nuzest’s Chai, Turmeric and Maca Clean Lean Protein (CTM-CLP) contains 1g of 100% pure Indian turmeric root and 19g of digestible protein per 25g serve, making it the perfect pre- and post-workout supplement. Because Curcumin alone has a very low bioavailability, CTM-CLP also contains 100mg of black pepper per serve which has been proven to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin in humans by 2000%.4 A clinical study conducted on elite rugby players has shown that the combination of curcumin and piperine (black pepper’s active ingredient) supplementation before and after exercise may help lessen some aspects of muscle damage.5

So if you’re looking to dial up the intensity of your training, or you want to recover and get back into it faster, try adding turmeric to your diet.

References:

1Proske, U., & Morgan, D. L. (2001). Muscle damage from eccentric exercise: mechanism, mechanical signs, adaptation and clinical applications. The Journal of Physiology, 537(Pt 2), 333–345. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7793.2001.00333.x

2Drobnic, F., Riera, J., Appendino, G., Togni, S., Franceschi, F., & Valle, X. et al. (2014). Reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness by a novel curcumin delivery system (Meriva®): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of The International Society of Sports Nutrition, 11(1), 31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-11-31

3Nicol, L., Rowlands, D., Fazakerly, R., & Kellett, J. (2015). Curcumin supplementation likely attenuates delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). European Journal of Applied Physiology, 115(8), 1769-1777. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-015-3152-6

4Shoba, G., Joy, D., Joseph, T., Majeed, M., Rajendran, R., & Srinivas, P. (1998). Influence of Piperine on the Pharmacokinetics of Curcumin in Animals and Human Volunteers. Planta Medica, 64(4), 353-356. http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-957450

5Delecroix, B., Abaïdia, A. E., Leduc, C., Dawson, B., & Dupont, G. (2017). Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 16, 147-153.

 

The Benefits of Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) for Energy and Exercise

MCTs

Fats – the endless scrutiny continues. Which ones are bad for us? Which ones are meant to be good for us? Which ones will make us put on weight? Everyone seems to have a different opinion. The good news is there is one type of fat that experts agree we don’t need to be concerned about – one that is not only good for our health but can also improve our energy and the quality of our workouts.

Medium Chain Triglycerides/Triacylglycerols (MCTs) are a unique form of dietary fat that provide numerous health benefits. Their reduced chain length not only means that they carry fewer calories, it also allows for accelerated metabolic conversion. This means that instead of our bodies storing them as fat (like Long Chain Fatty acids (LCTs)), the calories in MCTs are used immediately by our organs and muscles, making it one of the fastest, cleanest sources of fuel for the body.

MCTs have gained popularity with athletes looking to increase energy levels and enhance endurance during high-intensity exercise. 1 A review of the literature has shown that short-term ingestion of foods containing a small amount of MCTs suppresses the increase in blood lactate concentration and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during moderate-intensity exercise; whilst extending the duration of subsequent high-intensity exercise, at levels higher than those achieved by ingestion of LCT-containing foods.2

MCTs have also been found to assist with weight loss because of their lower caloric content than other fats, as well as their ability to enhance metabolism, increase energy expenditure, and promote the production of ketones – all without adversely affecting metabolic risk factors such as cholesterol and blood pressure.1,3,4,5 Scientists have attributed the energy-enhancing properties of MCTs to their rapid formation of ketone bodies thus making them an excellent choice for anyone that has increased energy needs or requires enhanced athletic performance.

Now that we have cleared the air on this group of ‘super’ fats, it’s time to put them to use in your own daily routine. Nuzest’s Coffee, Coconut + MCT Clean Lean Protein contains approximately 600mg of coconut-derived MCTs per 25g serve, making it the perfect pre-workout protein smoothie.

Click here for our Pre-Workout Coffee, Coconut + MCT thick shake recipe to help get the best out of every workout.

 

References:

  1. Dean, W. & English, J. (2013). Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) – Beneficial Effects on Energy, Atherosclerosis and Aging. Retrieved from https://nutritionreview.org/2013/04/medium-chain-triglycerides-mcts/
  2. Nosaka, N., Suzuki, Y., Nagatoishi, A., Kasai, M., Wu, J., & Taguchi, M. (2009). Effect of Ingestion of Medium-Chain Triacylglycerols on Moderate- and High-Intensity Exercise in Recreational Athletes. Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, 55(2), 120-125. http://dx.doi.org/10.3177/jnsv.55.120
  3. Mumme, K., & Stonehouse, W. (2015). Effects of Medium-Chain Triglycerides on Weight Loss and Body Composition: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Journal of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115(2), 249-263. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2014.10.022
  4. Rego Costa, A. C., & Rosado, E. L., & Soares-Mota, M. (2012). Influence of the dietary intake of medium chain triglycerides on body composition, energy expenditure and satiety; a systematic review. Nutricion Hospitalaria, 27(1), 103-108.
  5. St-Onge, M.-P., Bosarge, A., Goree, L. L. T., & Darnell, B. (2008). Medium Chain Triglyceride Oil Consumption as Part of a Weight Loss Diet Does Not Lead to an Adverse Metabolic Profile When Compared to Olive Oil. Journal of the American College of Nutrition27(5), 547–552.

 

The Importance of Protein in an Active Lifestyle

I think by this stage almost everyone knows that they ‘need’ protein, but in my lectures and workshops I still get questions like, “but won’t protein make me bulky?”, or, “won’t eating too much protein give me big muscles?”. And while most of us know that we do need to be eating ‘enough’ protein, less know how much ‘enough’ is and why it’s important!

What is it?
Protein quite simply is the building block of most of the structures in the body. ‘Protein’ is the name given to groupings of amino acids. Protein is broken down to these amino acids which are then used to create enzymes, muscle tissue, bone matrix and many other structural components of the body. All cells require protein.

Quick Fact: Over 98% of ALL the cells in your body are replaced every year!

Why do we Need it?
It helps us to become and remain lean! Protein has a higher ‘thermic effect of feeding’ (TEF) rating than either carbohydrates or fat. This means that when a higher proportion of your diet is protein your metabolic rate (and consequently fat loss) is going to be higher.

Improved Lean Body Mass
An optimal protein intake will allow us to maintain a higher lean body mass. This helps to give us the lean, fit looking physique that many desire (but not ‘bulky’!) whilst also improving metabolic rate further and helping to decrease fat stores and maintain leanness.

Improved Alertness and Focus
Amino acids supply the raw material for the excitatory neurotransmitters such as epinephrine, nor-epinephrine and dopamine. When we do not have enough of these amino acids we are more likely to suffer mental fatigue and physical fatigue.

Bone Structure and Health
Protein provides the matrix for bone and connective tissue. Ample protein helps to provide the structure for healthy bones!

How Much do we Need?
The recommended daily intake (RDA) for protein is based on the activity level of sedentary individuals and is measured by looking at the amount of protein taken in and compared with the amount excreted. It is approximately 0.8 grams per kilo of bodyweight.

What the RDA Doesn’t Take into Account
RDA and DRI (Dietary Reference Intakes) are ‘necessary’ amounts for baseline health. In other words – survival. But the optimal amounts we need in order to thrive may be much different!

As long ago as 1975 Gontzea et al have shown that a level of 1.5grams per day per kilo of bodyweight were insufficient when exercise was undertaken and other studies have shown that Tour de France athletes were only able to maintain a positive nitrogen balance at an intake of 1.8g per kilo per day.

Levels up to 3g per kg bodyweight per day (over 3 x the RDA) have been demonstrated to increase lean body mass, reduce fat mass and improve performance.

Most people will do well to get at least the RDA level with additional protein if and when able but overall quantity should be less important though, than eating good quality protein consistently.

The key ‘take home’ point is to eat quality protein at every meal.

Examples of Good Clean Green Plant Based Sources Would be

  • Sprouted lentils, chick peas or mung beans
  • Nuts or seeds (almonds, Brazil nuts, pumpkin seeds)
  • Tempeh or other fermented protein foods.
  • One 25g serve of Clean Lean Protein provides 22g of high quality protein.

NEW Clean Lean Functional Protein

Premium European Golden Pea protein is combined with functional ingredients from centuries-old Eastern medicine to help you perform at your peak.

Introducing our new Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours range. Your favourite Pea protein isolate enhanced and flavoured with ingredients that have been used for centuries in Eastern medicine to treat conditions from inflammation to low energy and fertility.

FUNCTIONAL INGREDIENTS

Three unique flavour combinations have been developed using sustainable European Golden Pea protein + functional foods, herbs and spices + natural flavours; all sweetened naturally with an extract from the West African Katemfe fruit (Thaumatin).

Protein is essential for energy, cell repair and immunity and Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours are a delicious way to nourish your body. All you need to do is choose a flavour to suit your daily requirements.

Chai, Turmeric + Maca

TURMERIC: A powerful anti-inflammatory used for centuries in Indian medicine.

MACA ROOT: Nutrient-dense and claimed to enhance fertility and energy.

Coffee, Coconut + MCTs

COFFEE: This powerful antioxidant promotes and enhances physical performance.

MCTs: Medium Chain Triglycerides are linked to weight loss and better cognitive function, occurring naturally in coconuts.

Vanilla Matcha

MATCHA: This green tea with slow-release caffeine is high in antioxidants and has been used in Eastern medicine for its brain-boosting effects (due to high levels of L-Theanine).

HOW TO USE

Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours is a ready to make protein smoothie. No need to add anything other than water or your choice of milk (e.g. rice, almond or coconut). You don’t even need a blender, simply shake and go!

WHO IS IT FOR

Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours is suitable for all ages, lifestyles and common dietary requirements. It’s founded on clean nutrition with nothing artificial – no fillers, added sugar or other nasties.

THE SUSTAINABLE CHOICE

Nuzest operate with the environment in mind. Golden peas provide a sustainable protein source using less water and less land than animal proteins. The isolation process is water-based, the water is then purified and recycled. Any waste goes to animal feed and biofuel.

INDEPENDENTLY TESTED & FREE FROM COMMON ALLERGENS

Ingredients are blended in Australia under strict GMP standards. The finished products are then tested to ensure they are safe and free from Gluten, Dairy and Soy.

Review: Best Pea Protein Powder is Nuzest

The following is an excerpt from the full article at superfoodly.com.

Whether you need it for building muscle or as a meal replacement for weight loss, the vast majority of the powders on the market – including those which are plant-based – come with 3 major pitfalls… 

1. Whey and casein causes gas and bloating 

2. Many vegan protein powders are bad, too

3. Stevia is “highly mutagenic” in animals, human effects unknown

Review of Nuzest protein

Unlike Vega and most other brands, Nuzest is unique in that they use golden peas grown in Northern France, which are then processed using chemical-free methods in Belgium.

The result is a pea protein unlike what’s in Vega and similar. This is a powder which for whatever reasons, does not seem to cause GI distress.

It blends amazingly, even with just plain water…

What you see there is how we prefer to eat Clean Lean Protein. Rather than dilute it in lots of water, we use a little and make a delicious protein-packed pudding. Topping it with berries, nuts, and raw cacao nibs gives you the satisfaction of ice cream or yogurt, but with the nutrients an athlete needs for a post-workout treat.

For weight loss, try substituting out your dessert with some of this.

For making a traditional shake, just add more water…

That’s blended with just a spoon in a glass of water. Not using a shaker or blender means there’s less air added to the drink and in turn, it’s another reason why you’re far less likely to experience gas and bloating with Nuzest.

When you use an electric blender to make a protein shake, all of that added air has to escape your body somehow.

A spoon and 20 seconds of stirring gives you this incredibly smooth texture with zero grittiness.

It’s one of the few alkaline protein powders in existence. Its pH is 7.8 is something you won’t find with whey protein or any animal-based source, unless it has something like baking soda added to it…

Read the entire article on superfoodly.com.