Turmeric for post-workout recovery

We’ve all felt it – that pain and stiffness that occurs several hours (and even days!) after unaccustomed exercise or overworking a particular muscle group. Known as ‘delayed onset muscle soreness’ (DOMS), we typically experience these pains when eccentric muscle activity is involved and the contracting muscles are forcibly lengthened.1 This mechanical stress triggers an inflammatory response and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in sustained inflammation and oxidative stress which can eventually lead to muscle injury and the dreaded DOMS.2

The medicinal benefits of regular turmeric consumption have been well documented; from improving brain function to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease, preventing and treating Alzheimer’s Disease and even fighting certain types of cancer. What is less commonly known is that Curcumin (the active constituent of Turmeric that gives it its distinctive yellow colour) has also proven to be beneficial in recovery from exercise due to its powerful antioxidant and inflammatory effects.

To test the theory, a trial was carried out to measure the effects of oral curcumin versus placebo on DOMS following unaccustomed heavy eccentric exercise. The study was a double-blind, randomised-controlled crossover trial in which the Curcumin or placebo were taken two days before to three days after eccentric exercise and the results found that only the Curcumin had beneficial effects. These included:

  • moderate to large reductions in single-leg squat and gluteal stretch pain at 24 and 48 hours post exercise,
  • reduced pain on walking down stairs, and
  • improved muscle performance.3

Another recent randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind trial comparing Curcumin with placebo was designed to assess the muscle damage of healthy male volunteers after performing a 45 minute downhill running race. Results found that 1g of turmeric given twice daily resulted in:

  • reduced MRI evidence of muscle injury in the posterior and medial compartment of both thighs,
  • less pain in the lower legs, and
  • reduced systemic inflammatory response in comparison to placebo.2

The results from these studies suggest that turmeric has the potential to be very beneficial in reducing post-exercise soreness after high intensity training.

Nuzest’s Chai, Turmeric and Maca Clean Lean Protein (CTM-CLP) contains 1g of 100% pure Indian turmeric root and 19g of digestible protein per 25g serve, making it the perfect pre- and post-workout supplement. Because Curcumin alone has a very low bioavailability, CTM-CLP also contains 100mg of black pepper per serve which has been proven to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin in humans by 2000%.4 A clinical study conducted on elite rugby players has shown that the combination of curcumin and piperine (black pepper’s active ingredient) supplementation before and after exercise may help lessen some aspects of muscle damage.5

So if you’re looking to dial up the intensity of your training, or you want to recover and get back into it faster, try adding turmeric to your diet.

References:

1Proske, U., & Morgan, D. L. (2001). Muscle damage from eccentric exercise: mechanism, mechanical signs, adaptation and clinical applications. The Journal of Physiology, 537(Pt 2), 333–345. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7793.2001.00333.x

2Drobnic, F., Riera, J., Appendino, G., Togni, S., Franceschi, F., & Valle, X. et al. (2014). Reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness by a novel curcumin delivery system (Meriva®): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of The International Society of Sports Nutrition, 11(1), 31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-11-31

3Nicol, L., Rowlands, D., Fazakerly, R., & Kellett, J. (2015). Curcumin supplementation likely attenuates delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). European Journal of Applied Physiology, 115(8), 1769-1777. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-015-3152-6

4Shoba, G., Joy, D., Joseph, T., Majeed, M., Rajendran, R., & Srinivas, P. (1998). Influence of Piperine on the Pharmacokinetics of Curcumin in Animals and Human Volunteers. Planta Medica, 64(4), 353-356. http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-957450

5Delecroix, B., Abaïdia, A. E., Leduc, C., Dawson, B., & Dupont, G. (2017). Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 16, 147-153.

 

The Benefits of Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) for Energy and Exercise

MCTs

Fats – the endless scrutiny continues. Which ones are bad for us? Which ones are meant to be good for us? Which ones will make us put on weight? Everyone seems to have a different opinion. The good news is there is one type of fat that experts agree we don’t need to be concerned about – one that is not only good for our health but can also improve our energy and the quality of our workouts.

Medium Chain Triglycerides/Triacylglycerols (MCTs) are a unique form of dietary fat that provide numerous health benefits. Their reduced chain length not only means that they carry fewer calories, it also allows for accelerated metabolic conversion. This means that instead of our bodies storing them as fat (like Long Chain Fatty acids (LCTs)), the calories in MCTs are used immediately by our organs and muscles, making it one of the fastest, cleanest sources of fuel for the body.

MCTs have gained popularity with athletes looking to increase energy levels and enhance endurance during high-intensity exercise. 1 A review of the literature has shown that short-term ingestion of foods containing a small amount of MCTs suppresses the increase in blood lactate concentration and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during moderate-intensity exercise; whilst extending the duration of subsequent high-intensity exercise, at levels higher than those achieved by ingestion of LCT-containing foods.2

MCTs have also been found to assist with weight loss because of their lower caloric content than other fats, as well as their ability to enhance metabolism, increase energy expenditure, and promote the production of ketones – all without adversely affecting metabolic risk factors such as cholesterol and blood pressure.1,3,4,5 Scientists have attributed the energy-enhancing properties of MCTs to their rapid formation of ketone bodies thus making them an excellent choice for anyone that has increased energy needs or requires enhanced athletic performance.

Now that we have cleared the air on this group of ‘super’ fats, it’s time to put them to use in your own daily routine. Nuzest’s Coffee, Coconut + MCT Clean Lean Protein contains approximately 600mg of coconut-derived MCTs per 25g serve, making it the perfect pre-workout protein smoothie.

Click here for our Pre-Workout Coffee, Coconut + MCT thick shake recipe to help get the best out of every workout.

 

References:

  1. Dean, W. & English, J. (2013). Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) – Beneficial Effects on Energy, Atherosclerosis and Aging. Retrieved from https://nutritionreview.org/2013/04/medium-chain-triglycerides-mcts/
  2. Nosaka, N., Suzuki, Y., Nagatoishi, A., Kasai, M., Wu, J., & Taguchi, M. (2009). Effect of Ingestion of Medium-Chain Triacylglycerols on Moderate- and High-Intensity Exercise in Recreational Athletes. Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, 55(2), 120-125. http://dx.doi.org/10.3177/jnsv.55.120
  3. Mumme, K., & Stonehouse, W. (2015). Effects of Medium-Chain Triglycerides on Weight Loss and Body Composition: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Journal of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115(2), 249-263. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2014.10.022
  4. Rego Costa, A. C., & Rosado, E. L., & Soares-Mota, M. (2012). Influence of the dietary intake of medium chain triglycerides on body composition, energy expenditure and satiety; a systematic review. Nutricion Hospitalaria, 27(1), 103-108.
  5. St-Onge, M.-P., Bosarge, A., Goree, L. L. T., & Darnell, B. (2008). Medium Chain Triglyceride Oil Consumption as Part of a Weight Loss Diet Does Not Lead to an Adverse Metabolic Profile When Compared to Olive Oil. Journal of the American College of Nutrition27(5), 547–552.

 

The Importance of Protein in an Active Lifestyle

I think by this stage almost everyone knows that they ‘need’ protein, but in my lectures and workshops I still get questions like, “but won’t protein make me bulky?”, or, “won’t eating too much protein give me big muscles?”. And while most of us know that we do need to be eating ‘enough’ protein, less know how much ‘enough’ is and why it’s important!

What is it?
Protein quite simply is the building block of most of the structures in the body. ‘Protein’ is the name given to groupings of amino acids. Protein is broken down to these amino acids which are then used to create enzymes, muscle tissue, bone matrix and many other structural components of the body. All cells require protein.

Quick Fact: Over 98% of ALL the cells in your body are replaced every year!

Why do we Need it?
It helps us to become and remain lean! Protein has a higher ‘thermic effect of feeding’ (TEF) rating than either carbohydrates or fat. This means that when a higher proportion of your diet is protein your metabolic rate (and consequently fat loss) is going to be higher.

Improved Lean Body Mass
An optimal protein intake will allow us to maintain a higher lean body mass. This helps to give us the lean, fit looking physique that many desire (but not ‘bulky’!) whilst also improving metabolic rate further and helping to decrease fat stores and maintain leanness.

Improved Alertness and Focus
Amino acids supply the raw material for the excitatory neurotransmitters such as epinephrine, nor-epinephrine and dopamine. When we do not have enough of these amino acids we are more likely to suffer mental fatigue and physical fatigue.

Bone Structure and Health
Protein provides the matrix for bone and connective tissue. Ample protein helps to provide the structure for healthy bones!

How Much do we Need?
The recommended daily intake (RDA) for protein is based on the activity level of sedentary individuals and is measured by looking at the amount of protein taken in and compared with the amount excreted. It is approximately 0.8 grams per kilo of bodyweight.

What the RDA Doesn’t Take into Account
RDA and DRI (Dietary Reference Intakes) are ‘necessary’ amounts for baseline health. In other words – survival. But the optimal amounts we need in order to thrive may be much different!

As long ago as 1975 Gontzea et al have shown that a level of 1.5grams per day per kilo of bodyweight were insufficient when exercise was undertaken and other studies have shown that Tour de France athletes were only able to maintain a positive nitrogen balance at an intake of 1.8g per kilo per day.

Levels up to 3g per kg bodyweight per day (over 3 x the RDA) have been demonstrated to increase lean body mass, reduce fat mass and improve performance.

Most people will do well to get at least the RDA level with additional protein if and when able but overall quantity should be less important though, than eating good quality protein consistently.

The key ‘take home’ point is to eat quality protein at every meal.

Examples of Good Clean Green Plant Based Sources Would be

  • Sprouted lentils, chick peas or mung beans
  • Nuts or seeds (almonds, Brazil nuts, pumpkin seeds)
  • Tempeh or other fermented protein foods.
  • One 25g serve of Clean Lean Protein provides 22g of high quality protein.

NEW Clean Lean Functional Protein

Premium European Golden Pea protein is combined with functional ingredients from centuries-old Eastern medicine to help you perform at your peak.

Introducing our new Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours range. Your favourite Pea protein isolate enhanced and flavoured with ingredients that have been used for centuries in Eastern medicine to treat conditions from inflammation to low energy and fertility.

FUNCTIONAL INGREDIENTS

Three unique flavour combinations have been developed using sustainable European Golden Pea protein + functional foods, herbs and spices + natural flavours; all sweetened naturally with an extract from the West African Katemfe fruit (Thaumatin).

Protein is essential for energy, cell repair and immunity and Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours are a delicious way to nourish your body. All you need to do is choose a flavour to suit your daily requirements.

Chai, Turmeric + Maca

TURMERIC: A powerful anti-inflammatory used for centuries in Indian medicine.

MACA ROOT: Nutrient-dense and claimed to enhance fertility and energy.

Coffee, Coconut + MCTs

COFFEE: This powerful antioxidant promotes and enhances physical performance.

MCTs: Medium Chain Triglycerides are linked to weight loss and better cognitive function, occurring naturally in coconuts.

Vanilla Matcha

MATCHA: This green tea with slow-release caffeine is high in antioxidants and has been used in Eastern medicine for its brain-boosting effects (due to high levels of L-Theanine).

HOW TO USE

Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours is a ready to make protein smoothie. No need to add anything other than water or your choice of milk (e.g. rice, almond or coconut). You don’t even need a blender, simply shake and go!

WHO IS IT FOR

Clean Lean Protein Functional Flavours is suitable for all ages, lifestyles and common dietary requirements. It’s founded on clean nutrition with nothing artificial – no fillers, added sugar or other nasties.

THE SUSTAINABLE CHOICE

Nuzest operate with the environment in mind. Golden peas provide a sustainable protein source using less water and less land than animal proteins. The isolation process is water-based, the water is then purified and recycled. Any waste goes to animal feed and biofuel.

INDEPENDENTLY TESTED & FREE FROM COMMON ALLERGENS

Ingredients are blended in Australia under strict GMP standards. The finished products are then tested to ensure they are safe and free from Gluten, Dairy and Soy.

Review: Best Pea Protein Powder is Nuzest

The following is an excerpt from the full article at superfoodly.com.

Whether you need it for building muscle or as a meal replacement for weight loss, the vast majority of the powders on the market – including those which are plant-based – come with 3 major pitfalls… 

1. Whey and casein causes gas and bloating 

2. Many vegan protein powders are bad, too

3. Stevia is “highly mutagenic” in animals, human effects unknown

Review of Nuzest protein

Unlike Vega and most other brands, Nuzest is unique in that they use golden peas grown in Northern France, which are then processed using chemical-free methods in Belgium.

The result is a pea protein unlike what’s in Vega and similar. This is a powder which for whatever reasons, does not seem to cause GI distress.

It blends amazingly, even with just plain water…

What you see there is how we prefer to eat Clean Lean Protein. Rather than dilute it in lots of water, we use a little and make a delicious protein-packed pudding. Topping it with berries, nuts, and raw cacao nibs gives you the satisfaction of ice cream or yogurt, but with the nutrients an athlete needs for a post-workout treat.

For weight loss, try substituting out your dessert with some of this.

For making a traditional shake, just add more water…

That’s blended with just a spoon in a glass of water. Not using a shaker or blender means there’s less air added to the drink and in turn, it’s another reason why you’re far less likely to experience gas and bloating with Nuzest.

When you use an electric blender to make a protein shake, all of that added air has to escape your body somehow.

A spoon and 20 seconds of stirring gives you this incredibly smooth texture with zero grittiness.

It’s one of the few alkaline protein powders in existence. Its pH is 7.8 is something you won’t find with whey protein or any animal-based source, unless it has something like baking soda added to it…

Read the entire article on superfoodly.com.

 

6 ingredients to beat the common cold!

Common in name, common in nature. The cold is one of the most frequent infectious diseases in humans with $2.9 billion spent on over-the-counter drugs in the USA alone.1 Contrary to popular belief it’s not just one virus but is comprised of more than 200 viruses.2 These viruses, particularly the Rhinovirus strain, affect the upper respiratory tract (nasal cavity, pharynx and larynx), in particular the nose.3

Unfortunately, there is no wonder cure to the common cold. Although vaccination may provide protection against some of the common ones, there are far too many to provide total protection, and new ones are regularly appearing. What is recommended, is keeping on top of your health year-round with the focus being prevention rather than treatment.

How is it spread?

There are two main ways in which the cold virus can enter the body; transmission through the air via droplets, or physical contact with contaminated objects (aka fomites) and then to the mouth and/or nose. Research tells us that viruses may be able to survive on objects for extended amounts of time (up to 18 hours for rhinoviruses).4

What are the Symptoms?

The main symptoms of a cold are a runny nose, coughing, blocked nose, sore throat, and occasionally muscle ache, fatigue, headache and loss of appetite may also occur. This can cause difficulty distinguishing between a cold and influenza (the flu), the latter generally having more severe symptoms and a lower likelihood of a runny nose.5,6

What can I do to Prevent it?

Lifestyle solutions

In addition to supporting your own natural defence mechanism (the immune system) through maintaining a healthy, balanced and nutrient-rich diet, ensuring that you get adequate sleep, keeping stress levels down and not over-extending yourself in your physical exercise regime, the easiest method to help prevent the cold during peak times is through monitoring your physical interactions with other people and with surfaces that may have been contaminated. Washing your hands regularly or using antibacterial hand wash in prone areas like public transport, schools, hospitals etc. is highly recommended.

Supplementation

There are varying studies on which specific nutrients can prevent, or speed up recovery from the cold. Listed here are some of the more common ones, together with notes to relevant research.

Zinc

One study in 2011 found that supplementation of zinc for a minimum of 5 months before contracting the cold reduced the incidence rate, school absences and antibiotic prescriptions. Additionally, supplementation 24 hours before the onset of symptoms saw the duration and severity of a cold notably reduced compared with those who didn’t supplement.7 The take-home message being, to make sure you’re getting the adequate amounts of zinc for optimal immune functionality all year round!

Foods rich in Zinc include: lean beef, spinach, pumpkin and squash seeds, cashews, cocoa powder, chickpeas, white mushrooms.

Nuzest Good Green Stuff contains 12mg per 10g serve, which is 109% of the RDI for adults aged 19-50yrs in Australia.

Ginseng

A 2005 experiment found that those who supplemented with ginseng over a minimum of 4 months had a reduced number of colds per year compared to those who did not supplement. Additionally, the severity and duration of the colds for those on ginseng were less than the placebo group.8

Nuzest Good Green Stuff contains 100mg per 10g serve.

Probiotics

Interestingly, the gut bacteria lactobacillus showed signs of limiting the likelihood of acquiring a cold when supplementing regularly. These results were greatly improved when supplementing with several essential vitamins and minerals at the same time.9

Nuzest Good Green Stuff contains 6 billion CFU (colony forming units) of dairy-free probiotics per serve. Other foods rich in Probiotics include: yogurt, kefir, dark chocolate, pickles, tempeh, sauerkraut.

Vitamin D3

A deficiency in vitamin D3 has been linked to an increased severity of the common cold. This may be due to its function in the creation of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that are used by immune cells to defend against cold viruses.10 Ensuring you have the optimal vitamin Din your diet all year round is essential to helping prevent the cold (in addition to other conditions such as weak bones).

Foods rich in Vitamin D3 include: sunlight (not a food but the best sources), salmon, tuna, milk, eggs, mushrooms.

Nuzest Good Green stuff contains 10µg per 10g serve, which is 200% of the RDI for adults aged 19-50yrs in Australia

Vitamin C

The use of vitamin C for colds has been a topic of heated discussion among researchers, however, in a review by Hemilä et al (11) showed that while it doesn’t reduce the incidence of colds it can help reduce their duration and severity. Even though it may not be the miracle vitamin, it is still beneficial for colds and, in general, a great antioxidant, required to produce collagen and in terms of iron absorption, is indispensable.12-14

Foods rich in Vitamin C include: capsicums, kale, kiwi, broccoli, strawberries, oranges, tomatoes.

Nuzest Good Green stuff contains 360mg per 10g serve, which is 800% of the RDI for adults aged 19-50yrs in Australia

Echinacea

Studies show that Echinacea shortens the duration of a cold if you take it when symptoms are present. A smaller (but not statistically significant) effect is observed for the prevention of colds with nearly all prevention trials pointing in the direction of (very) small preventive effects.15

Unfortunately, as of yet there is no cure to the common cold. As mentioned, this is mainly because of the many different virus strains that cause it!

At Nuzest we understand that health is complicated and we are a long way from understanding the intricacies of the human body. However, we do know that to function at our best we require the basic nutritional building blocks. That’s why we do what we do. Good Greens Stuff is filled with ingredients that support all 12 body systems and contains the majority of nutrients that help with prevention of the common cold.

So, next time you come down with a cold, consider if year-round great nutritional supplementation could have helped prevent or ease your runny nose! Or, don’t wait. Get started now; you won’t be disappointed.

 


References

  1. Fendrick AM, Monto AS, Nightengale B, Sarnes M. The economic burden of non–influenza-related viral respiratory tract infection in the United States. Archives of internal medicine. 2003 Feb 24;163(4):487-94.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Common Cold and Runny Nose. https://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/community/for-patients/common-illnesses/colds.html (accessed: 4th April 2017).
  3. Arroll B. Common cold.BMJ Clinical Evidence 2011; (): . https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275147/ (accessed 4 April 2017).
  4. Eccles R, Weber O, editors. Common cold. Springer Science & Business Media; 2009 Nov 16.
  5. Allan GM, Arroll B. Prevention and treatment of the common cold: making sense of the evidence. Canadian Medical Association Journal. 2014 Feb 18;186(3):190-9.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cold Versus Flu.https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/coldflu.html (accessed: 4th April 2017).
  7. Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. The Cochrane Library. 2011 Feb.
  8. Predy GN, Goel V, Lovlin R, Donner A, Stitt L, Basu TK. Efficacy of an extract of North American ginseng containing poly-furanosyl-pyranosyl-saccharides for preventing upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized controlled trial. Canadian Medical Association Journal. 2005 Oct 25;173(9):1043-8.
  9. Berggren A, Ahrén IL, Larsson N, Önning G. Randomised, double-blind and placebo-controlled study using new probiotic lactobacilli for strengthening the body immune defence against viral infections. European journal of nutrition. 2011 Apr 1;50(3):203-10.
  10. Wang TT, Nestel FP, Bourdeau V, Nagai Y, Wang Q, Liao J, Tavera-Mendoza L, Lin R, Hanrahan JH, Mader S, White JH. Cutting edge: 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a direct inducer of antimicrobial peptide gene expression. The Journal of Immunology. 2004 Sep 1;173(5):2909-12.
  11. Hemilä H, Chalker E. Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold. The Cochrane Library. 2013 Jan 1.
  12. Erdman Jr JW, MacDonald IA, Zeisel SH, editors. Present knowledge in nutrition. John Wiley & Sons; 2012 May 30.
  13. Gerald F. Combs, Jr..The Vitamins, 4th ed. United States: Academic Press; 2012.
  14. Boyera N, Galey I, Bernard BA. Effect of vitamin C and its derivatives on collagen synthesis and cross‐linking by normal human fibroblasts. International Journal of Cosmetic Science. 1998 Jun 1;20(3):151-8.
  15. Karsch-Völk M, Barrett B, Linde K. Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold. Jama. 2015 Feb 10;313(6):618-9.

Race Report From Triathlete and Nuzest Ambassador, Bryce Chong

“From the land of the rising sun… It was a scenic race around Osaka Castle. It took these 1000-year-old stones with a heavy downpour to help me conquer my wall of fear after failures from my past few races.

“It was again another race day with heavy rain on 25th June 2017 at noon. It was a line-up of 79 elite men, a deep water start in the moat of Osaka Castle with 2 narrow stairs (making it possible for only 1 person at a time to exit).

“I had a good swim start but got to work more on the change of pace gearing in with speed to position myself at the front. The exit was a beeline, but into T1, all was chop-chop, fast and good. It was raining heavily (as can be seen from the picture), and the bike course was very technical with lots of turns, puddles of water combined with sand and dead leaves, and above all very slippery… 5 loops of 4 km only increases the difficulty level. I was lucky to be in a pack with 3 others. Actually, the groups were rather fragmented with the actual 1st pack consisting of 6 athletes and the 2nd pack (which was also the biggest pack) consisting of about 12 athletes. Then, there were small packs of 3 to 4 to 5 athletes in several packs that followed. I believed I was probably in the middle.

“There were definitely several crashes and injuries, and everyone probably rode with caution except for the 1st pack, as the spectators later reported. It was good work in our pack and we eventually caught up with 2 others in front of the 3 loop and merged to become a 6-man-pack.

“T2 was also quick and smooth, and into the run. It was drizzling by then. I was a little off my pace in the 1st km of run and after the 2 km mark, I found my pace and legs, and my running improved. The injury I sustained in Taiwan, resulting in a tight and tense hamstring could still be felt slightly, but it didn’t interfere. I completed the race to earn a spot on the Commonwealth Games team.

“With a few more physio and chiro sessions back home, I’ll be ready for The Asia Championship in Palembang on 22nd July, which will also be the ASIAN Games selection race.

“Thank you Nuzest for your never-ending support and encouragement, it really spurs me on. The nutrition is part of my daily training, and it is definitely helping me on the road to being 100% again and training in full swing.”

Benefits of Good Green Stuff Ingredient: Turmeric

Turmeric’s strong anti-inflammatory profile combined with its powerful antioxidant activity makes it essential for your diet, not to mention essential for us to have included in Good Green Stuff.

It is the active constituent in turmeric, curcumin, that research has found to be beneficial in reducing pain and increasing functionality in osteoarthritis. It is an effective remedy for joint pain and is known to have anti-inflammatory properties. In fact, turmeric has been proven in medical studies to be equally effective as Ibuprofen when It comes to pain relief.

This is one of the reasons that turmeric is so effective for those of us on an exercise regime. Turmeric can prevent muscle exhaustion and injuries because it reduces inflammation in our joints and body. This allows us to recover faster and build muscle faster.

Turmeric stops inflammation at a cellular level and prevents it from becoming chronic inflammation, which can be a precursor to long-term injuries and inflammation. Inflammation at the cellular level can cause all kinds of problem, so it’s a good idea to stop this in its tracks.

Exercise does a heart good and so does turmeric. The American Journal of Cardiology reports that turmeric extract reduces post-bypass heart attack risk by 56%. Regular ingestion of curcumin, the primary polyphenol in turmeric (which gives the spice its golden hue) is proven to improve cardiac health. Nothing can replace good old exercise, but in combination the synergy of the two give your heart the love it needs.

Taking turmeric is so easy with Good Green Stuff and it is one of the many ingredients that help keep our bodies in tip-top condition.