5 Ways To Feel Refreshed Everyday

 

    Why is feeling refreshed not always easy? Our daily routine can sometimes make us feel exhausted. We wake up, drink or eat something and readily engage in something that is not really optimal for our health. As a result, we feel there is a lack of energy in our body to complete everyday tasks. And then, we want to know if there is a way to feel refreshed that does not require a lot of effort.

Feeling refreshed is not really difficult to achieve. All you need to do is develop a routine and try these tips:

  1. Switching from Hot to Cold Shower

The experts claim when the body encounters the switches from hot to cold showers, it benefits us a lot. For example, it leads to normal circulation of the blood. The skin is becoming more and more elastic and fresh-looking. Every organ gets enough portion of the oxygen, therefore, it begins to work better. Besides, a cold shower is perfect for those who are in deep depression because it lifts up one’s mood.

  1. Get Physical 

Going to the gym might seem like a boring option. It is important not for forget, the gym is not the only one way of doing sports. You may also try out different kinds of physical activities to feel great such as fitness, swimming, running, or dancing, etc.  Just choose the physical activity you like best and start doing it on the regular basis. Start by setting a time for your sports activity. Remember, that you should always stretch before every physical activity in order to avoid injuries. You may change the kind of sport and try another one if you get bored with it. Anyway, doing sports is such a beneficial thing for your health to try out, even if you have been hating sports since you were at school.

Energy, Feel Good, Refresh, Soulscape

  1. Drink More Water

The human body consists of 70% of pure water. Bear in mind, that it is pure water, not coffee, which you might drink all day long. Forget about soft drinks containing sugar if you want to feel refreshed every day and finally to feel alive. Drinking more water makes the blood in your veins more able to flow so that your mood will be better because mood and blood circulation are connected. Less sugar in your blood is always a good thing, too.

Every day drink 1,5 litres of a pure water. And remember, hunger can be easily confused with thirst. Have a glass of water before eating to avoid this.

  1. Create a Map of your Goals and place them near your bed

Each of us needs the reason to wake up every morning. Try thinking outside of the box focus on how to visually represent your life or activity on a sheet of paper.  Attach it just in front of a place you most often see when you wake up. The effect can be unbelievable. This piece of advice is based on the principle that every one of us has to have some sense in their life of the reason why they are alive. Being reminded of this every morning enables us to begin our day with a certainty about our purpose.

Energy, Feel Good, Refresh, Soulscape

  1. Keep Digital Device Out of the Bedroom

We live in the world of informational technologies; it’s almost impossible to find a person without any kind of digital gadget today. However, despite the fact that things are really helpful, they might be also destroying. It was estimated that if you keep your cell phone close to your chest during a day for a long period of time, sooner or later you might have heart-related issues with your health. Electronics influence our body’s biorhythms.

 

Energy, Feel good, Soulscape

Overall, there are countless ways to refresh ourselves each and every day. Walk a mile, listen to the energizing music!

Article by Helen Rodgers

Photos by Jeanette Lamb @graffitigoose

This article was originally published by our friends at SOULSCAPE.

The Singapore International Triathlon

Singapore International Marathon

The Singapore International Triathlon was a two-in-one meet for triathletes aiming to claim national glory. Besides serving as a national championship, the Sunday morning race also served as the final qualifying meet for athletes aspiring to be nominated to next year’s Commonwealth Games.

In this year’s championships, elite triathletes have a designated local-only category (1stwave start of the day at about 7:20 am) and we were also allowed to draft. There were 11 elite men and 3 elite females on the start line.

The swim leg was good, and into and out of T1, we had a tight bunch of 4. The pack worked really well together on the bike and that allowed us to adopt a pack strategy as we pulled and widened the gap between us and the rest. Transition through T2 was fast and I was out on the run in a blink. I went pretty hard on the 1st 3 km into the run to widen the lead as much as possible. My goal was just to go hard today and start getting on the ITU board for some valuable points to build a strong case for my nomination to compete at the Commonwealth Games, although I’ve already been nominated.

It has been a whirlwind since the beginning of this year for me, and I must honestly say it really hit me hard, really hard. I have my parents to thank for alwaysbeing there with and for me through these turbulent times. It helps, it really helped a lot – their advice, wisdom, warmth, love and above all their arms and shoulders are always a place I can turn to cry, hug and hide when I want to shut myself out and reflect.

The smiles came from loads of perspiration, tears, pain, sacrifices, commitment and my supportive and much-valued sponsors.

Thank you Nuzest for your never-ending support and encouragement. Securing my nomination with the Federation for both the Commonwealth & Asian Games in 2018, means a lot more work and sacrifice, goals to be achieved. Nuzest has become a necessary part of my day, and I’m really grateful for your faith in me and bringing me onboard. I am sure we’ll do Singapore proud together.

My next race in Japan – Murakami, on 24th September, will be a standard distance race. Till the next report, here’s wishing you pleasant weeks ahead. Tune-in then for more pictures and action in 2 weeks’ time.

There’s lots of work to do, and reflections to fine tune my standard distance race as I prepare for it.

The Steve Waugh Foundation’s “The Captain’s Ride”

Trevor Bolland, Nuzest’s founder and CEO is three months shy of participating in The Captain’s Ride; an annual 6 day, 800km bike tour of Tasmania in support of the Steve Waugh Foundation.

The Steve Waugh Foundation exists to champion the stories, provide life changing support and improve the quality of life for children and young adults (0-25) living with a rare disease. The Captain’s Ride is as beautiful as it is grueling, covering an expansive range of terrains over the distance.

Trevor is no stranger to committing his time, money and efforts into doing what he can in the hopes of improving the lives of others, in fact he has built his Sydney-based, globally reaching company on the premise of aiming to do just that.

His foray into the health industry was catalyzed in 2005 when his 23-year-old daughter was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis – an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system for which modern medicine is yet to find a cure. Not satisfied with the bleak prognosis they were given they looked to experts all over the world for advice – from neurologists and scientists, to naturopaths and everyone in between.

The knowledge and insight they gained over those years was life changing and resulted in careers in the health industry for both, planting the seeds for what is now Nuzest – Nutrition for Life.

Armed with a team of world-renowned health professionals they developed Nuzest – a nutritional platform based on efficacy without compromise; bringing together the best of nutritional science and natural medicine

Nuzest products are designed to offer complete nutritional support to those suffering with chronic disease, those affected by dietary restrictions and people seeking to deal with weight problems. It aims to fill the nutritional gaps caused by consuming nutrient-deficient food, our modern stressful lifestyles and poor eating habits.

The Captain’s Ride is another opportunity for Trevor to continue his path of simply wanting to do what he can to help. Whilst each participant is set to raise a minimum of $10,000, Trevor has set his sights on $15,000, which he hopes will make a big difference to the lives of these courageous young people.

If you’d like to support Trevor in achieving his goal and contribute to putting rare diseases on the map any donation big or small will be so appreciated.

Link to Trevor’s fundraising page: https://www.stevewaughfoundation.com.au/events/fundraiser-dashboard?memberId=3917

If you’d like any further information on the event please see the website link: https://www.stevewaughfoundation.com.au/the-captains-ride/

And here’s a look at the 2016 ride: https://vimeo.com/208577694

Race report #3 from Triathlete and Nuzest Ambassador, Bryce Chong

It’s such a blessing when the race site has scenic views and clear waters. The weather was hot, but with the race starting at 5.45 am, it settled pleasantly. The sunrise was also early and beautiful.

The Standard Distance race for Elite men was on 13th August 2017. It was a pontoon start, with a line-up of 27 elite men from 9 different countries.

The currents were pretty strong that morning with an incoming tide, but I was able to maintain and managed a decent 1500-meter swim. I exited from the swim with the 2nd pack (there were 6 of us), and we maintained this 2nd pack for the entire 40 km bike route. There were 4 people in the lead pack. It was a scenic 4 loops, but it went pretty fast on relatively flat grounds. Our pack worked really well on the bike, and that helped us increase the gap from the chase pack.

The run was 3 loops of 3.333 km. Off the bike, I felt pretty good on the run. Water stops were well spaced out and I made sure to hydrate well because the temperature was rising fast. I maintained a good pace for 8 km with good surges. I started to feel the pain creeping in after the 8 km mark, but I’ve been working on learning to curb and endure this strain and pain, and still push on with a steady pace. Overall, it was a pretty decent run and I finished the race 15th overall, with a time of 2 hours 01 minute and 57 secs.

I was happy with my race outing at Mt. Mayon, especially after my run at Palembang just over 2 weeks ago.

When I returned, I had 2 full days off of training. Then, it was back to training full swing last weekend to prepare for the National Championship on 10th September 2017, and maybe another race end of September (not yet confirmed), as well as a race in 3rd week of October in Hong Kong.

Thank you Nuzest for your never-ending support and encouragement, it really spurs me on. I comforted and blessed to know I am not alone in my journey.

 

Race report #2 from triathlete and Nuzest Ambassador, Bryce Chong

The last few races were blessed with heavy downpour and wet conditions; Palembang’s heat was totally merciless.

The race for Elite men was on 22nd July 2017 at 7 am. A pontoon start, with a lineup of 35 elite men and 28 U23 men starting together.

There was some shuffling and pulling during the swim leg, but otherwise it was a decent 1500-meter swim. There were several small packs upon swim exit, but it all formed out distinctively during the bike leg; 6 loops and the road was wide with several bends.  The 1st pack had 6 men, while the 2nd pack had 5 men. I was in the 3rd pack – which was also the biggest pack, with about 15 or so men. I was pretty happy with my bike leg that day.

The run was a 4 loop of 2.5 km, on a road without trees or shelter. The blazing sun and high humidity was unforgiving. During my first round in the run, I felt really lousy because I had this excruciating palpating pain on my head between my brows. After grabbing and pouring 1-1/2 bottles of water on my head and drinking the balance, the pain got slightly better, and I did surges to bridge the gap. The pain came back even stronger after my 2nd loop run and stayed. My thoughts were focused on my desire to complete the race, so I settled to a much slower pace, hydrating and pouring lots of water on myself at the 2 water stops to avoid crashing out under the heat and sun.

Ice cold towels greeted every athlete at the finish line. There were 3 to 4 athletes that succumbed to the unfriendly weather and DNF, and a good number who crossed the finish line had to be taken to the medical tent due to heat exhaustion and hallucinations, 2 or 3 had to be taken to hospital for IV drips. I’m really grateful and thankful I crossed the finish line, but had to be assisted to the medical tent to rest for about 20 minutes.

It wasn’t the decent time I was looking to do, but I am content that I was among the 2 other Singaporeans crossing the finish line for the Asian Games slot qualification.

Lots of work to do, and reflections to fine tune my game as I prepare for my next race.

THANK YOU Nuzest for your never-ending support and encouragement, it really spurs me on.

It’ll be 3 days of recovery before gradually gearing in again for my next race.

Till the next race, here’s wishing you all a very pleasant week and weeks ahead. Tune in again for more pictures and action in just 3 weeks’ time.

 

Race Report From Triathlete and Nuzest Ambassador, Bryce Chong

“From the land of the rising sun… It was a scenic race around Osaka Castle. It took these 1000-year-old stones with a heavy downpour to help me conquer my wall of fear after failures from my past few races.

“It was again another race day with heavy rain on 25th June 2017 at noon. It was a line-up of 79 elite men, a deep water start in the moat of Osaka Castle with 2 narrow stairs (making it possible for only 1 person at a time to exit).

“I had a good swim start but got to work more on the change of pace gearing in with speed to position myself at the front. The exit was a beeline, but into T1, all was chop-chop, fast and good. It was raining heavily (as can be seen from the picture), and the bike course was very technical with lots of turns, puddles of water combined with sand and dead leaves, and above all very slippery… 5 loops of 4 km only increases the difficulty level. I was lucky to be in a pack with 3 others. Actually, the groups were rather fragmented with the actual 1st pack consisting of 6 athletes and the 2nd pack (which was also the biggest pack) consisting of about 12 athletes. Then, there were small packs of 3 to 4 to 5 athletes in several packs that followed. I believed I was probably in the middle.

“There were definitely several crashes and injuries, and everyone probably rode with caution except for the 1st pack, as the spectators later reported. It was good work in our pack and we eventually caught up with 2 others in front of the 3 loop and merged to become a 6-man-pack.

“T2 was also quick and smooth, and into the run. It was drizzling by then. I was a little off my pace in the 1st km of run and after the 2 km mark, I found my pace and legs, and my running improved. The injury I sustained in Taiwan, resulting in a tight and tense hamstring could still be felt slightly, but it didn’t interfere. I completed the race to earn a spot on the Commonwealth Games team.

“With a few more physio and chiro sessions back home, I’ll be ready for The Asia Championship in Palembang on 22nd July, which will also be the ASIAN Games selection race.

“Thank you Nuzest for your never-ending support and encouragement, it really spurs me on. The nutrition is part of my daily training, and it is definitely helping me on the road to being 100% again and training in full swing.”

Partner Yoga Poses to Strengthen Your Relationship

The couple who does yoga together, stays together! Here’re 5 easy yoga stretches to strengthen relationship intimacy & love. 

Show your partner that yoga is as much for males as it is for females—these five simple and very easy yoga stretch poses can be done by a total beginner.

Standing Back Bend

Begin your partner yoga session with this stretch to warm up the back muscles and open the chest. Hold on to your partner’s forearm for balance, which also enables both of you to bend backwards deeper if needed.

Standing Forward Bend

forward fold

Do the Standing Forward Bend as the counter stretch. After you have folded forward, hold your partner’s arms for balance and to get a deeper stretch.

Seated Twist

Seated Twist

Stretch the core and obliques in this seated twist—turn to the left and reach for your partner’s right knee, and he does the same at the same time. Repeat on the right side. Ensure that your hips remain connected to the floor.

Seated Back Stretch

backbend

Partner yoga is great for loosening tight back muscles together. As you bend backwards onto your partner’s back, he bends forward to provide you with support. Repeat by allowing him to bend backwards onto you. Again, keep hips connected to the floor.

Boat Pose

Boat Pose

Give yourselves a partner yoga challenge by working the core muscles together with Boat Pose. Lift your legs and touch your feet with each other, then reach out to hold each other’s hand. For a deeper stretch, look up at the ceiling.

Bonus Pose: Plank

Plank

Feeling confident? Get your partner to plank and you use him as your support to do your plank on him!

This story was originally published by our friends at SOULSCAPE.

Quit Stressing! But Why?

Most of us know stress is bad for us. But turning it off isn’t always easy – it’s not just a simple switch you can turn on and off at will. What’s more, stress isn’t always bad for us – in fact, some of you will be pleased to learn (if you didn’t know it already) that we’re actually designed to function with some level of stress. Importantly, there is good stress and bad stress, or positive and negative stress. If we’re interested in being the best, most vital and healthy beings we possibly can be, we need to ensure we’ve got the right amount of positive stress, combined with as little negative stress as we can muster.

 

What kind of stress are you under?

Dr Hans Selye, the widely acknowledged ‘father’ of stress research, devoted an entire book to the subject of ‘stress without distress’. What’s clear from more than half a century of research on the subject is that we all have different levels of stress tolerance. Some people are able to cope with much higher levels of negative stress than others, and one person’s positive stress might be another person’s negative stress.

Stress is a reaction caused by a stressor of some sort. It might be excessive hours of work, a series of seemingly unrealistic deadlines, or a tyrant of a boss. It could be exams or a bully at school, a poor diet, or an under-par immune system that’s struggling to ward off infection. It might also be pushing yourself to the limit in a given sport or overdoing it in the gym. As Dr Selye said, “a painful blow or a passionate kiss can be equally stressful” — at different times, or to different people. He also reminded us that “complete freedom from stress is death”.

The nature, duration, severity and, in particular, our response to stress, are what determine whether stress is ultimately going to do us good or harm. And don’t forget, you can suffer negative stress that also does you good. An example of this is being caught in traffic on the way to the airport and then running late for a plane. The psychological and physiological stress response that causes you to run to the check-in juggling all your bags, and then through the terminal feeling as if you want to bowl over any slow-moving passengers or over-zealous security officers isn’t good for you. Your nervous system is on red alert, your heart has nearly punched its way out of your chest, and your adrenals are spent. But, although severe, it’s short-lived. Once you are seated in the aircraft, the relaxation that comes over you allows you to recover quickly. Ultimately it was your stress response that got you on the plane and, as unpleasant as it was, it might well have put you in a better and healthier position than facing the consequences of missing your flight. In evolutionary terms, you’ve successfully escaped a sabre-tooth tiger and that’s why the ‘flight-or-fight’ response remains with us today.

 

The stress response

Psychologists have come to define the stress response as the biological and psychological response to a threat that we don’t feel we have the resources to cope with adequately. That of course relates specifically to negative stress. Multiple systems in the body come into play, from the endocrine (hormonal) system, the nervous system, the immune system and the digestive system.

When confronted with a threat or potential stressor, the first thing we do is evaluate it with our senses. Our ability to do this very quickly helps us to survive as a species. If we decide the threat is real, and that we need to act quickly to reduce its impact, we trigger a cascade of events affecting multiple systems in our body, including three key endocrine organs – the hypothalamus and pituitary gland in our brain, and the adrenal glands that sit atop our kidneys. This is known as the ‘HPA axis’ and is a key part of what is sometimes called the psychoneuroimmunological (PNI) or—wait for it— psychoendoneuroimmunological system, owing to the multiple systems affected. More recent work suggests the gut and the gonads are also involved in the stress response; as a result, some functional medicine practitioners find themselves referring to the system as the HPAGG axis.

The key ‘stress hormones’ released from our adrenal glands belong to a group of steroid hormones called the glucocorticoids, the most important actor of which is cortisol which is synthesized from cholesterol. Cortisol and the HPA axis operate a complicated negative feedback system to control the stress response with hormones like adrenaline, and also to bring it quickly back into balance once the stress or threat has subsided.

 

What happens if you over-stress your body?

Typical stress responses include elevated heart rate, rapid breathing, elevated blood sugar levels (caused by cortisol triggering glucose production in the liver), decreased digestive activity, loss of appetite and a suppressed immune system. It’s not hard to see how this system that was designed primarily to help us survive more severe and short-lived threats and stresses, starts to create havoc with our bodies in our modern world where chronic stress, even though less severe, is so common. If our bodies are not given the chance to get back to our unstressed balance point things often go awry.

Gaining weight, developing ‘cortisol tyres’ around the mid-section, suffering gastrointestinal problems or regular infections, a failing memory, and losing our capacity to tolerate ‘normal’ levels of stress, are all examples of symptoms of chronic, inadequately managed stress.

The good news is there’s lots we can do to transform negative stress into something more positive, as well as supporting the body nutritionally so it can cope better with stress. And that’s going to be the subject of the next three articles in this series.

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